Table Saw History 101

Almost all line of work has some sort of main equipment. The painter has his canvass to pain his masterpiece. The field journalist has his trusty pen and pocket notebook to jot down hurried notes.

The surgeon has his scalpel to smoothly perform an operation. Likewise, a woodworking shop would be useless without the woodworker’s centerpiece: the woodworking table saw.

History of Table Saws

Woodworking table saws have been around for more than two centuries. Some historians point to a British sailor named Samuel Miller as the inventor of the table saw in 1777. Some say that Walter Taylor built the table saw to make his primary occupation, cutting wood for shipbuilders, a lot easier back in 1762.

But exactly made the first table saw is yet to be agreed upon. But one thing is for sure: work in almost all woodworking shop centers around the table saw.

The table saw is basically made up of a circular saw blade that is mounted on an arbor and is powered by a motor. The blade juts through the heavy and smooth surface.

The raising and lowering of the blade is controlled by a handle. Modern saws have separate handles for adjusting the angles of the blade and have systems for dust collection.

Yet, the basic simple structure of the table saw remains the same. The simple construction of a saw provides its main attribute: stability while cutting wood.

Having a stable work surface is of prime importance. It helps a woodworker to make precise cuts and avoid mistakes.

But that is not what woodworkers value woodworking table saws for. Woodworking is such a tasking work. Various wood cuts are needed to be done throughout the day. And not only one type of cut will be needed. Throughout the day at a workshop, a woodworker makes infinite types of cuts with different angles.

These saws make woodworkers’ jobs a lot easier because it can be used to make price cuts on almost any possible angle-be it crosscuts, rips, or bevels. Woodworking table saws are also used to square, miter, groove, shape, and join pieces.

No saw can parallel the versatility of woodworking table saws. So, it is not surprising that the woodworking saw has become the standard centerpiece of a workshop.

If you are a woodworking enthusiast who loves to cut wood in your workshop during Saturdays and Sundays, or if you are a professional whose main job involves cutting wood, then you should have a table saw in your workshop.

There are many woodworking table saws on the market. But do not just settle for the first relatively unknown saw that you happen to see on the hardware store. The salesperson may talk a lot of flowery things about the saw, but do not go for it.

You should see to it that your table saw would be of top quality and has a name. You’re your money count by investing in a high-quality saw made by renowned makers like Hitachi, Jet, Ridgid, Makita, Bosch, and Porter-Cable.